Sunday, April 17, 2011

What do Search Engines Want? What do they find pleasant?

Basically search engines will want a website with the following theme in its index

  • Original and unique content of genuine value.
  • Pages designed primarily for humans, with search engine considerations a secondary concern.
  • Hyperlinks intended to help people find interesting, related content, when applicable.
  • Metadata (including title and description) that accurately describes the contents of a web page.
  • Good web design in general.

So how do we achieve this? Let me give you a few suggestions that are crucial.

  • Make a site with a clear hierarchy and text links. Every page should be reachable from at least one static text link.
  • Offer a site map to your users with links that point to the important parts of your site. If the site map has an extremely large number of links, you may want to break the site map into multiple pages.
  • Keep the links on a given page to a reasonable number.
  • Create a useful, information-rich site, and write pages that clearly and accurately describe your content.
  • Think about the words users would type to find your pages, and make sure that your site actually includes those words within it.
  • Try to use text instead of images to display important names, content, or links. The Google crawler doesn't recognize text contained in images. If you must use images for textual content, consider using the "ALT" attribute to include a few words of descriptive text.
  • Make sure that your <title> elements and ALT attributes are descriptive and accurate.
  • Check for broken links and correct HTML.
  • If you decide to use dynamic pages (i.e., the URL contains a "?" character), be aware that not every search engine spider crawls dynamic pages as well as static pages. It helps to keep the parameters short and the number of them few.
And finally these are the types of websites or webpages that you don't want to make

  • Pages that harm the accuracy, diversity or relevance of search results.
  • Pages dedicated to redirecting the user to another page (doorway pages).
  • Multiple sites or pages offering substantially the same content.
  • Sites with numerous, unnecessary virtual hostnames.
  • Pages produced in great quantities, which have been automatically generated or which are of little value (cookie cutter pages).
  • Pages using methods to artificially inflate search engine ranking.
  • The use of text or links that are hidden from the user.
  • Pages that give the search engine different content than what the end user sees (cloaking).
  • Sites excessively cross linked with other sites to inflate a site's apparent popularity (link schemes).
  • Pages built primarily for the search engines or pages with excessive or off-topic keywords.
  • Misuse of competitor names.
  • Multiple sites offering the same content.
  • Sites that use excessive pop-ups which interfere with user navigation.
  • Pages that seem deceptive, fraudulent, or provide a poor user experience.

1 comment:

Tuxedo Kamenn said...

I don't think so, actualy the TOP RANKING in SERP dominade a BIG COMPANY Website That Paid Goolge for RANK in SERP. They Content Actualy Againist TOS of google. See wikianswere, see ask,com they always on top search where the content of that site? expecialy wiki answere... or nettag,com where the content? its just list of Product.....

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